Why Being a Pole Dancer Sucks Sometimes

“You can dance on my pole anytime.”

“Isn’t pole dancing just for strippers?”

“I have a pole you can play with.”

“Aw, that’s cute.”

 

These are only some of the comments pole dancers everywhere receive far more frequently than necessary.

Let me clarify a few things here: yes, I pole dance. No I don’t want to dance or play with your pole.. it is probably smaller than I’m used to. Yes, strippers pole dance as well- you must feel special for making that association. It’s cute is it? I dare you to come lift yourself from your shoulder and feel “cute”- assuming you’re strong enough to do so, of course.

Cute is it?

Cute is it?

I love pole dancing. And to be honest, I’m not shy about telling people what I do. But every so often my patience wears down and I feel as if the world needs a big kick to the face.

Unfortunately though, the above comments are not the focus on my rant today. Today I thought I’d share a special stereotype, one I come across far more frequently. The assumption that because pole dancing is part of my career choice, I must be pretty flaky, dumb or generally no help at all.

ditzy

So let’s clear the air here. Yes, I teach pole dancing. I am both certified and insured. No, my certification was not done in two days. Actually, to obtain my beginner, intermediate and advanced certifications took over two and a half years.

But most people don’t care about that. So let’s head into training shall we?

I currently hold a certification called CSCS or Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist. Please go look this up. Literally. Right now.

You need a post-secondary education just to write this exam. It is equivalent to teaching yourself Kinesiology at home… only more specific as it gears towards sport performance. For those of you who are having trouble understanding, go grab your latest issue of “Oxygen Magazine“. See the letters CSCS beside the writers names- that is what this is. It’s not only recognized worldwide but it’s prestigious as well.

PN-certified-coach-logoOn top of that. I hold a certification with Precision Nutrition. This certification has been listed one of the top fifty nutrition programs to take. It is similar to a four year university degree. And again, not a day course.

So what does all that mean? Well, without stating the obvious, it appears that I’m not as ditzy as you may believe.

 

Let me put this another way. I am the person who can:

  • Fix your pain (back/knee/shoulder- really wherever it may be) through progressive training and imbalance correction
  • Reduce your risk of developing heart disease/diabetes/chronic illness
  • Reduce your need to take medication daily for the rest of yourself
  • Aid and improve with digestive ailments
  • And yes, help you look awesome- amongst other things

 

And yet, I am not taken seriously? Why? Because I am a pole dancer.

While I am not knocking modern medicine (it does save lives) I am questioning the fact that doctors (and nurses) receive very little training in the way of nutrition, pain and muscular imbalance. So while I agree that you should go to the doctor when something is amiss, please don’t under estimate the value of a knowledgeable trainer to help you with your problems.

Because the fact is, our training is very different… medication and disease versus prevention and management. And if you think that living with any kind of chronic pain or digestive issues is “normal” maybe you should re-evaluate your own intelligence first.

mart

So please stop assuming that pole dancers (and trainers for that matter) are on the “look good, get jacked, know nothing” end of the spectrum. Instead, seek out proper qualifications and respect them. Because last time I checked, underestimating the knowledge of (Read: pissing off) the person stronger than you is never a light bulb idea.

Rant over.